michelin-brigestone

As a continuation of COP26, during which the Group reasserted its commitments to the planet, Michelin decided to devote an entire day to the 100% sustainable tire in Ladoux, the Group’s R&D “flagship”. It allowed Michelin to reiterate its drive to keep investing and innovating in tires, in line with its new strategic plan, “Michelin in Motion,” unveiled last April.

Reducing the tire’s environmental impact throughout its life cycle

Life cycle analysis (LCA) evaluates the impact a product or service has on the environment throughout its entire life cycle, as well as on various issues such as climate change, diminishing resources, human health, and changes in land and water use.

Michelin is using Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) to reach our goal of making 100% sustainable tires as quickly as possible. LCA allows us to assess environmental impacts throughout the tire’s life cycle, from the extraction of raw materials, through tire design, production, and use and right up to end-of-life processing. Though this analysis shows that the use stage is the most significant, a major part of the tire’s impact during use is determined by its design. It is therefore crucial to start at the beginning of the chain, not only by integrating more sustainable materials but also by continuing to progress in the choice of materials that reduce the impacts during use. To do so, we must develop tires with long-lasting performance, rolling resistance that minimizes CO2 emissions and extends the life of electric vehicle batteries, and a design that reduces emissions from tire and road wear particles.”

 

Eric Vinesse, Executive Vice-President, Research & Development – Member of the Group Executive Committee.

Michelin is using Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) to reach our goal of making 100% sustainable tires as quickly as possible. LCA allows us to assess environmental impacts throughout the tire’s life cycle, from the extraction of raw materials, to the tire’s design and production, to its use, and even end-of-life processing. Though this analysis shows that the use stage is the most significant, a major part of the tire’s impact during use is determined by its design. It is therefore crucial to start at the beginning of the production chain by integrating more sustainable materials and minimizing impacts during use. To do so, we must develop tires with long-lasting performances, rolling resistance that minimizes CO2 emissions and extends the life of electric vehicle batteries, and a design that reduces emissions from tire and road wear particles.”

 

Eric Vinesse, Executive Vice-President, Research & Development – Member of the Group Executive Committee.

The different stages in the tire’s life cycle

How to accelerate the transformation of waste into raw materials?

Michelin aims to accelerate the transformation of waste into raw materials, which will then be used to produce new tires or go to other industrial processes, plays a key role. For this purpose, the Group is building partnerships with innovative companies developing groundbreaking technologies to recycle and regenerate materials.

  • Examples of partnerships

  • BioButterfly

    The BioButterfly project aims at producing butadiene using ethanol derived from biomass to replace petroleum-derived butadiene. Ultimately, 4.2 million tons of wood chips could be integrated into Michelin tires each year..

  • Carbios

    Via a revolutionary process developed by partner company Carbios, objects made from a certain type of plastic (PET) are broken down by enzymes into their building block monomers. Close to 4 billion plastic bottles could be recycled into MICHELIN tires each year.

  • Enviro

    In a unique process developed by partner company Enviro, end-of-life tires are decomposed by pyrolysis to recover some of their components, including carbon black. With this technology, 56 million tires could be recycled each year to make new Michelin tires.

  • Pyrowave

    In an innovative process developed by Pyrowave, microwaves are used to break down polystyrene objects in order to recover their original building block: styrene. With this technology, the equivalent of 80,000 tons of polystyrene waste could be recycled into MICHELIN tires each year.

  • BioButterfly
  • Carbios
  • Enviro
  • Pyrowave

Moreover, at the Smithers Recovered Carbon Black conference on November 22, 2021, Michelin and Bridgestone presented their joint strategy to facilitate access to recycled carbon black from end-of-life tires to produce new tires. According to Sander Vermeulen, Vice-President, Marketing & Business Development, Strategy and New Business, High-Tech Materials: “We felt the time to find solutions that would enable the rubber industry as a whole to become more circular by increasing its ability to adopt recycled and/or recovered materials from end-of-life tires. I am delighted that we found a partner in Bridgestone that shares our vision, and together we invite stakeholders across the tire and rubber value chain to participate in the journey toward material circularity.”

michelin-brigestone

Michelin’s commitments to the planet for 2030

Also see:

The 100% sustainable recipe is harder than it looks!

Recevez nos informations par email